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Thread: Beware Dog Nappers

  1. #1
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    Beware Dog Nappers

    I was just approached by a dog napper at Willenhall Memorial Park. I was walking Zilla off leash and a man walked past shouting that Zilla was beautiful. I said thank you and kept walking. He shouted that he mustn't be more than 6 months old and I told him he was two years. At this he walked over and stood there talking to me. He said the general things - he was lovely and he loved his eyes, what a great temperament etc. Then he said, "I have a friend who has one of these dogs (little note here that anyone who owns a Vizsla has to explain what a Vizsla is more than once every walk as very few people know the breed. So if his friend had, in fact had a Vizsla, I imagine he would have used the breed name.) and he had him castrated! I said to him what's the point on spending so much money on these dogs just to do that to them!" I said Zilla's been castrated. He said "oh that's such a shame, oh well. Thank you for talking to me. (to Zilla) your mummy's so silly!" then walked away and never looked back.

    This might seem like an overreaction but we all know what stands for normal dog talk when being approached. Asking whether Zilla was castrated or hinting by telling me of his 'friend' illicits only two responses: we've had ours done or oh I agree, in which case he could have moved on to other questions - KC registered, pedigree, been bred before etc before either asking to buy him or just trying to take him.

    I had a client who I always refer back to her story. She had a 4 month old female staffy with unusual colourings - beautiful girl. She was going to visit her sister and take the dog so she was walking down the street when 4 lads approached her. They asked whether she was KC registered, pedigree, been spayed and being proud of her dog she answered honestly, which was yes to KC and pedigree, no not spayed due to age. They then asked to buy the dog and started at 200 and rose to 2000! She kept saying no and walked quickly away. They followed her at a distance and when she finally reached her sister's house she let herself in and felt safe away from the lads. That weekend the sisters house was robbed. Nothing was really taken apart from a tv but the coincidence is too great for me. If it was these lads, they must've thought that was her house and likely where the dog stayed and broke in to steal the dog.

    Just be aware! If you have someone asking you strange questions, always playdown the value of your dog. Even if it's not true always say that they have been spayed or neutered, that they are not KC registered and not pedigree. Tell them that the dog has some issues - not dog friendly, not people friendly - but if your dog is quite happily behaving themselves you can always clarify and say sometimes she/he just takes a dislike to someone and goes for them.

    If after any of these answers makes the person walk away - you know you've just saved your dog. Be aware when going home after this encounter to make sure you are not followed just to prevent any further pestering.

    They may seem perfectly charming and just interested in your dog because a friend has one or family member has one, but always carry suspicion if the above subjects come up in conversation.

    Sorry to off-load but I couldn't help wondering if someone else not as suspicious were to have encountered that man whether they would've lost their dog.
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  2. #2
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    I know that dog thefts are on the rise but I can never get my head round what is in it for the thieves.

    I can just about grasp stealing a working dog as a lot of time and effort goes into training them so stealing a trained one would be a shortcut. But stealing one to breed from or to sell on? Is there really much of a market for dog with no pedigree papers?

    There are rescue centres packed with dogs without papers that people could get so why would they payout big money for a dog from some unverified source?

    Like I say I know this is going on and very much in the increase but I just can't figure out where these dogs are going.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  3. #3
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    Stolen dogs have various destinations depending on their appearance & the contacts of the theives. Some thefts are oragnised & even commisioned whilst others are more opportunistic (dogs tied up outside of shops or left in gardens & cars)...........
    Professional theives are very well organised & have a whole array of tricks up their sleeves to achieve their goals. They will usually concentrate on & suss out one area for a short period collect all the dogs they can then move off to another, which makes tracking them very difficult.


    Some will end up being sold from a car boot on deserted pub carparks,.....staffies sell like hot cakes......also a ransom may be the motivation, dognapping is on the increase.
    A specific breed or one that looks like a breed may end up either sold through the press or a specific outlet (hunting breeds for example) or spend the rest of it's miserable existance as breeding stock on puppy farms or illegitimate kennels where false papers & documents are often made.They may also be sold on abroad.
    Mongrels & other non descriptive dogs may well have the fate of either becoming a bait dog ( used to train fighting dogs) for the dog fighting rings or sold through the back door of some unscrupulous labarotory practising vivisection for 'off the record' experiments.
    Needless to say never leave your dog unattended outside of the house & of course don't let them roam.
    Last edited by Blacktimberwolf; 14th-August-2013 at 11:33 AM.
    Properly trained, a man can become a dog's best friend.

  4. #4
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    Pretty good answer but also there is a market for people who don't really care if they have a pedigree or KC registered. The amount of times I hear 'oh yes he's KC registered, we just didn't get the papers from the breeder'. Even though there are so many documentaries talking about puppy farms, most people just don't know about it. They'll get adverts and meet people 'halfway' to save petrol etc and not see puppies with their mums. But mainly those that are sent off to be bred from can get quite a lot of money from the puppies.
    Find Kim and Zilla on You Tube for clicker tutorials and tricks

  5. #5
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    Didn't you all hear about the little dog in Erskine not so long ago? The lady was walking the dog (little mongrel, I think) on a leash and a man approached and started chatting the usual 'doggy' stuff while petting the dog. While still chatting, he unclipped the dogs leash and ran in the opposite direction, calling on the dog, who of course, followed. This dog was missing for a couple of weeks but the lady put it all over FB and the dog was too 'Hot' so they abandoned him. You should have seen the wreck the dog came back like. He is still not the same friendly pup that went missing, they say and he needs a behaviourist now. Poor pup.
    After I heard this story, I worked on a strong stand/stay command with all mine so I know that if this were to happen to me, I could get my dogs to stop.
    Horrible but it's happening all over.
    And, PS, the dogs are not just getting stolen to sell, they are also being used as dog baiting for fight gangs. Quite a few dog have been found bound and gagged and bitten to death, washed up on the Forth.

  6. #6
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    Yes it's all terrible. I'm happy with Zilla's recall and I know it's hard to hold onto 5 stone of Vizsla when he struggles so if the bloke had just tried to snatch I doubt he'd have been able to keep a hold of him once I started calling. That's not so easy with a smaller dog or even a happy friendly dog that would go off with anyone. It's sad that this is the world we're living in. I have to tell people not to teach their recall to the dog's name, not to put the dog's name on their ID tag etc etc just to try and help in anyway to keep their dogs safe.
    Find Kim and Zilla on You Tube for clicker tutorials and tricks

  7. #7
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    I heard about the Erskine incident. You never seem to hear about anyone getting caught stealing dogs. Surely some of them must be getting caught.
    John

    I started at the bottom and I like it here

  8. #8
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    It's hard to prove ownership. Even with microchipping, the number of dogs that are microchipped and registered to their old owners is huge, but without the manpower to go around microchipping every dog, nothing happens. It's like the picking up poop law, I saw someone's dog squat right in front of a policeman and the woman just shrugged and walked the dog away and all the policeman did was shake his head. I was like that's a grand you've just let walk away! To the policeforce, dog napping isn't a huge crime so they don't want to spend manpower bringing them to justice. That is painting them all with the same brush and I do know of some police officers who are interested but I don't think they have a canine department or something like that.
    Find Kim and Zilla on You Tube for clicker tutorials and tricks

  9. #9
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    Microchipping is no safeguard as the chips can either be removed manually by a small incission in the dog's neck or disactivated by passing a low voltage current through them.
    As for prosecuting dog theives it isn't considered a major crime & the prosecution has to prove that the individual(s) did indeed steal the dog(s) & unless they are actually found in possession of the stolen dog(s), (which they rarely are as the dogs have already been sold or are being kept in a different location awaiting their destiny) it is very difficult to prove.
    Properly trained, a man can become a dog's best friend.

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